Japanese Dolls

Welcome! This is a blog about traditional Japanese dolls, including kokeshi, kimekomi dolls, hakata dolls, and washi dolls, among others. There doesn't seem to be much information regarding these dolls on Tumblr, so I'm sharing images and information about them here. Additionally, I'll sometimes post pictures of the dolls I'm working on here. Enjoy! :-D
Kimekomi dolls at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden in New York City.

Kimekomi dolls at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden in New York City.

A papier mache prince doll on a horse. This doll was made in Okinawa.

A papier mache prince doll on a horse. This doll was made in Okinawa.

(Source: http)

A group of adorable Mojigaseki clay dolls picking and serving tea. These dolls are made in Fukuoka Prefecture.

A group of adorable Mojigaseki clay dolls picking and serving tea. These dolls are made in Fukuoka Prefecture.

(Source: m.facebook.com)

A pair of Takasago dolls. These dolls portray a loving and long-lived couple, Jou and Uba, from the Noh play Takasago. Jou is usually depicted with a rake, as he was believed to bring in good luck, while Uba carries a broom to sweep out bad luck.

A pair of Takasago dolls. These dolls portray a loving and long-lived couple, Jou and Uba, from the Noh play Takasago. Jou is usually depicted with a rake, as he was believed to bring in good luck, while Uba carries a broom to sweep out bad luck.

derpilyeverafter:

A hakata doll in a cream-colored kimono. The design on the bottom left side of her kimono is a noshi, which is an auspicious decoration often attached to gifts.

derpilyeverafter:

A hakata doll in a cream-colored kimono. The design on the bottom left side of her kimono is a noshi, which is an auspicious decoration often attached to gifts.

A serene-looking empress doll for Hina Matsuri. This doll was made using the kimekomi method.

A serene-looking empress doll for Hina Matsuri. This doll was made using the kimekomi method.

apartmentnumber102:

A giant Daruma at the Daruma-ji/ Shorinzan.This one was way taller than me.

apartmentnumber102:

A giant Daruma at the Daruma-ji/ Shorinzan.
This one was way taller than me.

fromthefloatingworld:

Katsuo-ji daruma 07 by MShades on Flickr.

Each of these is a wish come true. You buy the Daruma from the temple, write your dream on it and fill in one eye. If you get what you wished for, you fill in the other eye and bring it back to the temple. They range in price from 2000 yen to upwards of 100,000.

fromthefloatingworld:

Katsuo-ji daruma 07 by MShades on Flickr.

Each of these is a wish come true. You buy the Daruma from the temple, write your dream on it and fill in one eye. If you get what you wished for, you fill in the other eye and bring it back to the temple. They range in price from 2000 yen to upwards of 100,000.

astringofmadhousefloozies asked: This might seem like a strange question, but I have a very nice hakata doll that I got a few years ago from a yard sale. If I take pictures of her, would you like to see? You seem like the person who's appreciate her. She's different-looking than the ones you've posted on the blog.

Sure, feel free to send a picture!

You can submit your own pictures of traditional Japanese dolls (and dolls made using traditional methods) right here! Please do so! Thank you! :-D